Monday, September 8, 2014

Seattle Seahawks and Old Women: Green Bay Packers Unpacked


Contributed by Kathe Frahm

Old women don't care much about pre-season games. They have learned don't bother unless it counts... in everything.

Back in the rec room at the home, all wearing Seahawks T-shirts now, the old women troop in with more food than anyone can eat, including the lone old man in the back. They all bring the excitement and nervous laughs that precede every game. But this year, so much more is riding on their expectations. All remember poor showings from former Seahawks teams. They need winners. Old women are familiar with loss. They withstand and endure and soldier on, but that doesn't mean they like it.

The old women comment on their boys that are missing. Golden Tate was a favorite. One woman said Tate was just plain cute. Walter Thurmond too, even though he was a screw up. If you're using drugs, don't get caught.

The women weren't too sure about the Packers. Oh, they thought Aaron Rodgers was kind of nice to look at, especially every time he overthrew a receiver or got sacked. No sympathy here for a kid who was so outclassed by their Russell Wilson. Packers getting any score on the board was met with anxious screams, but with kicker Steve Hauschka's perfect field goal, they calmed down and breathed a sigh of relief that all would be well. Of course again when Steve was in kicking position, many somewhat risque comments were made about his great long legs.

The old women stop talking only when plays are being run. If there are ten women in the room, there are five completely different conversations going around the room. The old man in the back of the room is in on all of it, enjoying his exclusive status. He does have helpful knowledge of the game but the women are quick to shut him down if they think he is showing off or talking down to them. There are limits of tolerance. Old women have much experience with overbearing men and do not suffer them gladly.

He did make one comment about seeing an uncalled Packer foul that made the women howl with laughter. He yelled that he could see the foul and he was miles away.


Marshawn Lynch was just doing his job with Packers hanging off of him. The old women counted the Packer defenders he dragged along with him. Remarks about him earning his pay were common. Yet when he got hit especially hard by the Green Bay defense, one old woman jumped up, hands on ample hips and screamed: “Stop it boys! Don't make me come over there!” A Mom thing.

Cleaning up the room and carefully saving left-over food, the talk was mostly about their Russell and how the California surfer boy, Coach Pete Carroll, still is classy and so good at what he does. Bringing fifty some young men with such passion and egos into a cohesive working and winning force is no small feat for any coach. Carroll has and is succeeding. Some old women know that drive. Some never had it.